Postdoc - Biomedicine

Cross talk between autophagy and oncogenic signaling pathways and implications for cancer therapy.


Journal article


Sahib Zada, Jin Seok Hwang, Mahmoud Ahmed, Trang Huyen Lai, Trang Minh Pham, Omar Elashkar, Deok Ryong Kim
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1876(1), 2021 Apr 13, pp. 188565-188565

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APA
Zada, S., Hwang, J. S., Ahmed, M., Lai, T. H., Pham, T. M., Elashkar, O., & Kim, D. R. (2021). Cross talk between autophagy and oncogenic signaling pathways and implications for cancer therapy. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, 1876(1), 188565–188565.

Chicago/Turabian
Zada, Sahib, Jin Seok Hwang, Mahmoud Ahmed, Trang Huyen Lai, Trang Minh Pham, Omar Elashkar, and Deok Ryong Kim. “Cross Talk between Autophagy and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways and Implications for Cancer Therapy.” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1876, no. 1 (April 13, 2021): 188565–188565.

MLA
Zada, Sahib, et al. “Cross Talk between Autophagy and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways and Implications for Cancer Therapy.” Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1876, no. 1, Apr. 2021, pp. 188565–65.


Abstract

Autophagy is a highly conserved metabolic process involved in the degradation of intracellular components including proteins and organelles. Consequently, it plays a critical role in recycling metabolic energy for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in response to various stressors. In cancer, autophagy either suppresses or promotes cancer progression depending on the stage and cancer type. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer metastasis are directly mediated by oncogenic signal proteins including SNAI1, SLUG, ZEB1/2, and NOTCH1, which are functionally correlated with autophagy. In this report, we discuss the crosstalk between oncogenic signaling pathways and autophagy followed by possible strategies for cancer treatment via regulation of autophagy. Although autophagy affects EMT and cancer metastasis, the overall signaling pathways connecting cancer progression and autophagy are still illusive. In general, autophagy plays a critical role in cancer cell survival by providing a minimum level of energy via self-digestion. Thus, cancer cells face nutrient limitations and challenges under stress during EMT and metastasis. Conversely, autophagy acts as a potential cancer suppressor by degrading oncogenic proteins, which are essential for cancer progression, and by removing damaged components such as mitochondria to enhance genomic stability. Therefore, autophagy activators or inhibitors represent possible cancer therapeutics. We further discuss the regulation of autophagy-dependent degradation of oncogenic proteins and its functional correlation with oncogenic signaling pathways, with potential applications in cancer therapy.